Megan and Murray McMillan

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Megan and Murray McMillan Megan and Murray McMillan are video, photography and installation artists who have been collaborating since 2002. They have exhibited at the Casa Masaccio Center for Contemporary Art in San Giovanni Valdarno, Italy, the Kunsthallen Brandts in Odense, Denmark, the State Museum of Contemporary Art in Thessaloniki, Greece, the National Museum of Art in La Paz, Bolivia, and the deCordova Museum in Lincoln, Massachusetts. They are currently working on a large scale commissioned project for the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art. They are represented by Qbox Gallery in Athens, Greece. The McMillans have been artists in residence in Barcelona, Los Angeles, Tzia and Athens, Greece and Turku and Kokar, Finland. Their work has been featured in film festivals in New York, London, Los Angeles, Switzerland, Austria, Croatia, Greece and Romania. Their work has been included in the 2012 DeCordova Biennial at the deCordova Museum, Wild Things at the Kunsthallen Brandts in Denmark (2010), the 2nd Thessaloniki Biennale of Contemporary Art (2009), and the 10th International Istanbul Biennial (2007). Their work has been reviewed in Art in America, ArtLies Quarterly, among others.

Bio

Megan McMillan (born 1975, Dallas, TX) has a MFA from Massachusetts College of Art and Design. Murray McMillan (born 1973, Dallas, TX) has a MFA from The University of Texas at Austin and a BFA from Kansas City Art Institute. The McMillans have been married since 1997.

On Air: Megan and Murray McMillan

The ikono On Air Festival is showing the following films by Megan and Murray McMillan selected by leading curator Paolo Colombo: "What We Loved and Forgot" (2010) Megan and Murray McMillan What We Loved and Forgot is a single channel video, site-specific video installation, and a series of photographs. A meditation on memory and loss, the video begins with a man seated on an easy chair in a room surrounded by discarded newspapers. The man rises from the chair, ascends into a white space and then makes his way through a field where workers are assembling giant yellow day lilies until he ultimately steps into a new room above a kitchen where a woman is making a real-life meal that will feed the cast and crew. The soundtrack was written and performed by Megan and Murray McMillan. "When We Didn't Touch the Ground" (2012) When We Didn't Touch the Ground When We Didn’t Touch the Ground is a single-channel video, a site-specific video installation and a series of photographs. This work is an homage to the environments the artists created as children, reinterpreting the sites of their early imaginative lives to explore what it means to combine creative worlds. In the video, a man climbs down a mountain range of stacked furniture, carrying sandbags, and walks through a mylar creek bed to put the sandbags on a dam. Meanwhile, a cube with a woman in a hammock rises from behind the mountain range and lifts her through the space until she descends on a rope of bedsheets to join a real-life dinner party in progress. The Remains of Something Whole (2011) The Remains of Something Whole The Remains of Something Whole is a performance installation, a single-channel video, a site-specific video installation and a series of photographs. This project is in two phases: a live performance installation and a video. Phase one was a live performance in 2011, which was a collaboration between director/designers Megan and Murray McMillan, writer Rachel Jendrzejewski and composer Peter Bussigel. Phase two is a video designed by the McMillans that meditates on the process of collaborating with Jendrzejewski and Bussigel. In the video, an actor leaves the bank’s vault and walks slowly through the chaos of an actual live rehearsal. She steps inside the moving set, which is modeled after her own head, and climbs to the top to adjust a spotlight until it illuminates her to the point of obscurity. The soundtrack includes diegetic sounds and Bussigel’s performance, which is based on samples of Arvo Part’s Kanon Pokajanen. While She Waits for the Light (2009) While She Waits for the Light While She Waits for the Light is a single-channel video, a site-specific video installation, and a series of photographs. Based on the painting The Annunciation, with Saint Emidius (1486 ) by Carlo Crivelli, a man walks in a red grid that contains household lamps. He picks up a lamp and passes it through a window to a woman who is dressed in white and is in a white corridor. The woman stacks the light on a shelf, and plugs it in. The shelf then begins to move backwards through the corridor to reveal another window. Outside this window is an office where a couple is engaged in a conversation, oblivious to the lamp now waiting on the window’s ledge. The soundtrack is Send the Light (1890), sung by Helen Dunkin, Murray McMillan’s grandmother, and her Baptist church in Dallas, Texas. The Oldest Song We Know (2007) Megan and Murray McMillan The Oldest Song We Know is a single-channel video, a site-specific video installation and a series of photographs. A model city consisting of photographs of American buildings is pulled by people with a fishing line through the Aegean, close to where the island of Atlantis supposedly sank. The soundtrack is a rendition of the Epitaph of Seikilos, the oldest known musical composition with lyrics, dated around 200 BC. The song is in-scribed on a tombstone found in modern Turkey in the late 1800s. The lyrics are While you live, shine / Don’t suffer any-thing at all / Life exists only a short while / And time demands its toll.

Links

- Homepage of Megan and Murray McMillan : www.meganandmurraymcmillan.com - Megan and Murray McMillan on Vimeo - Megan and Murray McMillan at Qbox

Other Videos by Megan and Murray McMillan

Coal Project Model (Work in Progress) This is a model of the project we're currently working on. What Stands Between Us and the Sun (2010) Sea Shovel (2006) Talk: Megan and Murray McMillan Megan and Murray McMillan discuss their installation, When We Didn't Touch the Ground, a large-scale video installation in which they built an homage to the environments that they each created as children, reinterpreting the sites of their early imaginative lives to explore what it means to combine creative worlds. From towers of stacked furniture to a dammed up creek to a treehouse that can only be accessed by a long climb up bedsheets, the McMillans have re-created these seminal, invented sites of their childhoods. These places and narrative play-scapes are the root of their practice. When We Didn't Touch the Ground is a re-creation of these familiar spaces of youth: that liminal moment between the intensity of a child's play and the call to dinner. (from BrownCAC)

Curators' Special

Part of the curatorial selection of Paolo Colombo