Paul Pfeiffer

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Paul Pfeiffer - The Morning after the Deluge Paul Pfeiffer is a Contemporary sculptor, photographer, and video artist who often uses found footage in his installment pieces. Pfeiffer's innovative work in sculpture, video, and photography incorporates recent computer technology to investigate the role society and the media play in shaping our awareness. One of Pfeiffer's better-known works is Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (2000). For this piece, Pfeiffer took found footage (footage taken by another artist) of a basketball game. He digitally removed all the players on the floor with the exception of one. This way, the viewer is forced to focus more intensely on that one player and perhaps can take note of the activity going on beyond the court. Usually presented on small LCD screens, Pfeiffer's video work urges the viewer to focus on obsession with celebrity by removing the celebrity and forcing one to look beyond it at the things that would have been missed. Another of his well-known works is Live From Neverland (2007), a two-part installation in which Pfeiffer took Michael Jackson's 2003 press conference and removed his voice, replacing it with 80 children singing Jackson's dialogue. Pfeiffer's sculpture work includes miniature dioramas of sets from the movies Exorcist and The Amityville Horror. These make up a series entitled Scenes of Horror.

Bio

Paul Pfeiffer, the child of Methodist missionaries, was born in Honolulu, HI in 1966, but spent most of his childhood in the Philippines. He earned a BFA in Printmaking at the San Francisco Art Institute before moving to New York, NY, in 1990. In New York, he received an MFA from Hunter College. Pfeiffer also took part in the Whitney Independent Study program. Paul Pfeiffer is represented by Thomas Dane in London, UK. His work is also displayed at the Paula Cooper Gallery in New York, NY, and he is also represented by Carleir Gebauer in Berlin, Germany. In 2000, Pfeiffer was a recipient of the inaugural Bucksbaum Award, given by the Whitney Museum of Modern Art in New York, NY. A retrospective of his work was organized by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's List Visual Arts Center and the Museum of Contemporary Art, in Chicago in 2003. In 2002, Pfeiffer was an artist in residence at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and ArtPlace in San Antonio, TX. Pfeiffer currently lives and works in New York, NY.

Links

- Paul Pfeiffer on Wikipedia - New York Times: ART IN REVIEW; Paul Pfeiffer -- 'Pirate Jenny'

Videos

Paul Pfeiffer on Art21 | Preview from Season 2 of "Art in the Twenty-First Century" Paul Pfeiffer's groundbreaking work in video, sculpture, and photography uses recent computer technologies to dissect the role that mass media plays in shaping consciousness. Pfeiffer's intimate and idealized video works are often presented on small LCD screens and loop infinitely—meditations on faith, desire, and a contemporary culture obsessed with celebrity. Paul Pfeiffer is featured in the Season 2 episode "Time" of the Art21 series "Art in the Twenty-First Century". Complete Art21 Episode starring Paul Pfeiffer Paul Pfeiffer was born in Honolulu, Hawaii in 1966, but spent most of his childhood in the Philippines. Pfeiffer relocated to New York in 1990, where he attended Hunter College and the Whitney Independent Study Program. Pfeiffer’s groundbreaking work in video, sculpture, and photography uses recent computer technologies to dissect the role that mass media plays in shaping consciousness. In a series of video works focused on professional sports events—including basketball, boxing, and hockey—Pfeiffer digitally removes the bodies of the players from the games, shifting the viewer’s focus to the spectators, sports equipment, or trophies won. Presented on small LCD screens and often looped, these intimate and idealized video works are meditations on faith, desire, and a contemporary culture obsessed with celebrity. Many of Pfeiffer’s works invite viewers to exercise their imaginations or project their own fears and obsessions onto the art object. Several of Pfeiffer’s sculptures include eerie, computer-generated recreations of props from Hollywood thrillers, such as “Poltergeist,” and miniature dioramas of sets from films that include “The Exorcist” and “The Amityville Horror.” Paul Pfeiffer: Perspective Machine Video tour by Maria Baibakova Image on top of page from Weserburg: Paul Pfeiffer, Morning after the Deluge, 2003, courtesy Thomas Dane